Informational Category

Colonial Chocolate Spices: Nutmeg

Visitors to Captain Jackson’s Historic Chocolate Shop are often surprised to discover that our colonial drinking chocolate is seasoned with eight different spices. American Heritage Historic Chocolate is flavored with cinnamon, vanilla, nutmeg, chili pepper, anise, orange zest, salt, and annatto, as well as a small amount of sugar. We will be taking a closer […]

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Colonial Chocolate Spices: Vanilla

Visitors to Captain Jackson’s Historic Chocolate Shop are often surprised to discover that our colonial drinking chocolate is seasoned with eight different spices. American Heritage Historic Chocolate is flavored with cinnamon, vanilla, nutmeg, chili pepper, anise, orange zest, salt, and annatto, as well as a small amount of sugar. We will be taking a closer […]

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Historic Chocolate Popsicles

Independence Day is quickly approaching, and we’re busy preparing for our annual holiday celebrations at Captain Jackson’s. If you’re in Boston for the holiday, visit us at Captain Jackson’s Historic Chocolate Shop and the Old North Church for fun and festive events each day of Harborfest. If your preparations for the Fourth of July include […]

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Colonial Chocolate Spices: Cinnamon

Visitors to Captain Jackson’s Historic Chocolate Shop are often surprised to discover that our colonial drinking chocolate is seasoned with eight different spices. American Heritage Historic Chocolate is seasoned with cinnamon, vanilla, nutmeg, chili pepper, anise, orange zest, salt, and annatto, as well as a small amount of sugar. We will be taking a closer […]

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Winnowing: Separating the Shell from the Bean

Chocolate is made from cocoa beans, which grow as the seeds of cacao pods. These seeds are surrounded by a thin shell that must be removed before they can be ground into chocolate. During the 18th century, the removal of cocoa bean shells was done largely by hand through a process known as winnowing. When […]

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Chocolate Tea

Colonial American drinking chocolate was very rich and thick because it contained a high level of cocoa butter, the natural fat found in cocoa beans. For individuals looking for the flavor and stimulating effects of chocolate without the heaviness of cocoa butter, there was chocolate tea. While the more popular drinking chocolate was made from […]

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Colonial Sugar Cones

Sugar was much more expensive in colonial America than it is today. Because of its high cost, sugar was not added to chocolate by chocolate makers of the 1700s. Instead, consumers would add a small amount of sugar to their drinking chocolate while it was being prepared. Individuals would have purchased their sugar in the […]

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Chocolate in Colonial Military Life

As chocolate became increasingly popular throughout the 1700s, it also was increasingly enjoyed by members of the military. By the middle of the 18th century, chocolate was accessible to almost everyone living in the American colonies and was inexpensive enough to be considered a nourishing and energizing staple for soldiers of all ranks. At the […]

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Evacuation Day

March is flying by, but this month contains one of Boston’s most important holidays. March 17 is known as St. Patrick’s Day to many, but in Boston it is also the date of Evacuation Day, a holiday that commemorates the day British troops evacuated Boston in 1776, ending the eleven month siege of Boston. The […]

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Chocolate and Coffeehouses in Colonial America

In the 1700s, chocolate was not only enjoyed at home with family and friends, but was also commonly served at local public coffeehouses.  By the 18th century, public houses such as taverns and alehouses were well established as places to socialize while drinking alcoholic beverages, but coffeehouses were a more recent development. The introduction of […]

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